Evidence for Ofsted

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Dot Com is a recommended PSHSE resource supported by the Home Office. It is a ‘safeguarding tool’ to raise awareness and keep pupils safe from the dangers of abuse, sexual exploitation, radicalisation and extremism. It promotes children’s rights and fundamental British values. The programme will undoubtedly, help schools comply with the new legislation ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’ and will give schools evidence that the children are being taught how to stay safe. The school can use this as part of their statutory risk assessment and as evidence for OFSTED that they are preparing children for life.

DFE – KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE IN EDUCATION        (September 2016)

This is statutory guidance from the Department for Education issued under Section 175 of the Education Act 2002, the Education (Independent School Standards) Regulations 2014 and the Non-Maintained Special Schools (England) Regulations 2015. Schools and colleges must have regard to it when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. This means that they should comply with it unless exceptional circumstances arise.

The DFE Keeping Children Safe In Education states:

“Governing bodies and proprietors should ensure children are taught about safeguarding, including online, through teaching and learning opportunities, as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum. This may Include covering relevant issues through personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE)”

Dot Com provides school staff a framework to deliver on the above statutory requirement. With the children’s personal journals staff can evidence that safeguarding is being taught to the children themselves. The Dot Com programme based on research and evidence gathered from teachers and police officers and third sector covers all areas of SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development) & BRITISH VALUES whilst giving children the skills and the confidence to make safer choices.

Regarding Ofsted – Inspectors will always report on whether or not arrangements for safeguarding children and learners are effective. They will make judgments with regards to:

“Children and learners can identify a trusted adult with whom they can communicate about any concerns.” “They report that adults listen to them and take their concerns seriously. “ 

There is a clear approach to implementing the Prevent duty and keeping children and learners safe from the dangers of radicalisation and extremism.”

Children and learners are able to understand, respond to and calculate risk effectively, for example risks associated with child sexual exploitation, domestic violence, female genital mutilation, substance misuse, gang activity, radicalisation and extremism, and are aware of the support available to them.”

Through the teaching of Dot com schools can evidence that they are covering all the identified points that Ofsted will require.

British Values paragraph – to be inserted in ALL guides:

The Dot Com programme is a key resource for the promotion of safeguarding, social, moral, spiritual and cultural values (SMSC) and British Values.

What does the  Dot Com programme do? : 

encourages pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence;

promotes pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development;

pupils will be encouraged to accept responsibility for their own behaviours, show initiative and to understand how they can contribute positively to the lives of those living and working in the locality of the school and wider society;

pupils will gain an understanding of the importance of respecting their own and others’ cultures;

pupils will gain an understanding of how citizens can influence decision–making through the democratic process;

enables pupils to distinguish right from wrong;

provides pupils with an appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for our wellbeing and safety.

The resource is a safeguarding tool for children, giving them the skills to recognize risky situations while instilling the confidence to make safer choices at home, school and in the community.

Dealing with disclosures:

Throughout the teaching of the Dot programme, the journals are a ‘safe’ place for children to express, scribe or draw their feelings and thoughts. In certain cases children may make disclosures in their journals that are of concern. These need to be immediately dealt with in line with your school’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policies. In order to safeguard children, the adult teaching the session needs to ensure that completed journal pages are reviewed at the end of each session.

Evidence for OFSTED

Pupils report that they value being taught about how to deal with the anti-social behaviour, gang culture, and knife and gun crime that exist in some of their local neighborhoods. The academy does not shy away from confronting these issues and adopts a proactive approach. Positive role models are used to reinforce high standards of behaviour and to help pupils understand how to deal with difficulties that they may meet, including in relation to the safe use of the Internet and social networking sites. Attendance is now in line with the national average and has improved considerably because of the good range of strategies to promote better attendance. 

(HMI March 2013) – BIRMINGHAM INNER CITY SCHOOL

        

The school’s work to keep pupils safe and secure is outstanding. Pupils trust adults in the school implicitly and learn how to be responsible for their own actions. Parents and staff are unanimous in their view that the pupils are safe and very well looked after.

Pupils have a good understanding of different types of bullying, and report only the odd isolated example of name-calling, and ‘never’ physical bullying. They also have a good awareness of cyber-bullying and the dangers of the Internet.

All cultures mix happily together in a lively and colorful environment, and are provided with an excellent spiritual, moral, social and cultural education.  – Ofstead Report Birmingham School 2014

What the children say:

Quotes from Fairchildes School

‘I think you have made me a nicer person than I was before because now I know that however people look we should treat them the same way.’ – Bryanna

I feel better now that you talked about being special and that everyone is special.’ – Emily

‘I like this because when I am sad I just write a few things in my Dot Com book which is my diary, it makes me feel better and it lets me know that I’m not all alone with Dot Com.’ 

You have helped me with all my problems and I am very grateful’ – Sky

‘I know what to do when I am nervous, I can tell people how I feel about them.’ – Felicity

‘You have made me feel better on the internet and also better with other people. You have helped me not to talk to strangers and to talk to someone we  know.’ – Isabelle

‘This makes me so much more safe on the computer and makes me so more comfortable in the world. I am so confident with my social life now you are by my side.’ – Skye

‘I have learnt how to be safe and when I meet a stranger I will know what to do, I just need to tell an adult.’ – Aneena

‘It is so fun learning with you, it was so satisfying. You helped me learn that I can always stand up for myself and others.’

‘Thank you for making me feel safe on the internet , also thanks for making me notice I’m allowed to talk to people who I know when I’m scared.’ – Tyreese

‘You have helped me learn about internet safety and why you should not tell people your name and address. – Safiya

You have helped me learn that you should always stay safe on the internet and if people ask where do you live, say I am not telling you.’ – Crystal

‘I like you because you help me and if it is a situation that I don’t know, I will stay calm, take a deep breath and remember some of the things that you told me…’ – Megan

The Dot Com Children’s Foundation was launched at the Home Office in 2013 by civil servant volunteers. The Home Office logo was given to the charity by the Crime Prevention Minister and the charity was given permission to use the words ‘supported by the Home Office’ on resources by civil servants.

The charity has created a number of high quality resources over a period of more than 10 years for both primary and secondary school children which help educate children about violent crime including knife crime, weapons, gang and youth violence, domestic violence, PREVENT, child abuse and FGM.

The  Values Versus Violence Education Programme for both primary and secondary schools has been developed with Home Office funding either granted directly or given through Police sources. It has been nationally and locally piloted and is currently in use in schools with 33 thousand children in Birmingham, London, Essex, Manchester, Merseyside, South Yorkshire and Oxford. 

One of the main reasons for the success of the programme which is run by our charity is the support we have had from ACPO Presidents and civil servants. The Government Finance Profession and Treasury Outreach Programmes have been particularly active in helping to develop strategy and a network of role models and volunteers to visit schools, support the programme and inspire children. The charity has had a number of civil service fast streamers help to develop strategy and development of materials.

The resources are delivered through high quality soap opera for teenagers and a set of children’s journals based on a cartoon character called Dot Com for primary schools. There are a range of free resources for schools as well as paid for materials and safeguarding training. The charity also operates a very successful parent programme for vulnerable families and children.

The Values Versus Violence Programme unites children from all backgrounds and religions by reinforcing good family values in school and helping children practice how to do the right thing. It is a programme developed with the support of the police and teaching professionals and is designed to prevent children from being hurt or becoming victimised or groomed into criminal behaviour.

Using a cartoon character called Dot Com, who speaks to children in their own language, the programme helps them develop the skills to deal with risky situations and learn to make their own

choices. Based on the Protective Behaviours Process children learn that we are all individual and

special and we all have the right to feel safe all the time. It helps children learn how to communicate with adults by teaching them that we can talk with someone about anything even if it feels awful or small.

Children who value themselves and have good personal values make safer choices and are more

likely to reach their full potential in life. The programme is delivered in primary school to children

aged 5 to 11 through a series of personal journals that each child owns. Local community role

models are also encouraged to visit schools to talk to children about dreams and aspirations and to

help them believe they can achieve in life. A family journal which the children take home involves

parents in reinforcing the good values message and there are a range of options offered by the charity for working with families on a one to one basis with supporting materials.

All children need the chance to practice the values they learn at home among their peers and Dot

encourages children to follow the golden rule of all religions ‘treat others as you would like to be

treated yourself’.

RESOURCES

The resources use a cartoon character and series of personal values journals, including a family journal for use at home, to deliver the messages to primary school children.

A values soap opera supported by targeted films on key issues delivers the message to secondary schools. The soap called Watch Over Me is a Secondary School soap funded for schools to use by the Home Office and police and clips are available for download on www.vvvuk.com

The resources cover the following issues developed as part of Home Office prevention strategies:

Knife and Gun Crime/Ending Gang and Youth Violence – Primary school journals in Year 5 and 6 were updated with lessons through TKAP and the Kinsella Report. Series 2 and 3 of Watch Over Me covers the issue of knives and guns with bespoke film packages to support.

Domestic Violence – Values Versus Violence journal and Year 3 primary journal . Series 2 Watch Over Me also covers this issue.

PREVENT / Terrorism – All primary journals updated through PREVENT funding from Home Office and DFE to include ‘Living Together’ lessons. Series 4 Watch Over Me and a bespoke Living Together film with lesson plans created with ACPO TAM.

FGM – The VVV primary school resources have been endorsed and recommend to safeguarding boards as a prevention for FGM in a guide created by the Violent Crime Unit at the Home Office in 2014. Also recommended is the bespoke film called ‘Cut – Some Wounds Never Heal’ which was funded by the Home Office and overseen by Operation Azure in the Metropolitan Police. It was made by teenagers about the issue and can be found with lesson plans at www.vvvuk.com.

Child Sexual Exploitation – Primary school journals have been updated to include social media risks and are in use in Oxfordshire brought in by Thames Valley Police and the Safeguarding Board as a prevention strategy. A parent programme is being developed with Police and social services to alert parents to the risks and then allow them to work on a family journal with children to build resilience in children to the groomers.

Knives and Weapons –

Child Abuse/Self Harm – The primary school journals all carry the Protective Behaviours theme ‘We can talk with someone about anything even if it feels awful or small’. Sarah’s Story on www.vvvuk.com is the story of a teenage girl who was sexually abused and explains how this lead to self harm.

Street Robbery/Bullying/Peer Pressure – Primary school journals in Year 5 and 6 carry specific lessons on these issues including Theft and What is a Crime, as well as The Value of the Law.   Series 1 of  Watch Over Me covers these issues and was made in memory of Milly Dowler, who was abducted on her way home from school and murdered.

Teenage Pregnancy/Relationships and Choices – Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue of sex and relationships. Primary school journals in Years 4 and 5 cover building relationships and who we might marry.

Drugs and Alcohol/Volatile Substance Abuse – Primary school journals in years 5 and 6 were updated with lessons in 2011. Series 4 Watch Over Me also covers this issue.

Social Media and Internet Safety – Primary school journals covers these issues and were        updated in 2013 to include CSE issues. Lessons were created in partnership with CEOP. Series 3 Watch Over Me carries a CEOP story line and was filmed with officers based there.

Fraud/Loan Sharks/Debt/Value of Money – Primary school journals in Years 4, 5 and 6 were updated with lessons supported by the HM Treasury Outreach Programme. Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue of fraud and loan sharks which was developed with the Serious Fraud Squad and City of London Police.

Dreams and Aspirations – If children are to achieve in life then teachers and role models need to encourage dreams and aspirations. All primary journals include these lessons and they are supported by visits from civil servant volunteers at the Home Office. Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue along with employment.

Parents – a family journal and ‘Getting to Know You’ journals is available for schools to run workshops with parents and for children to take home to work with their families on the key issues and values education.

Teacher and Police Lesson Plans are included in the programme all linked into the curriculum so they can be delivered by the teacher but supported by the police.

Safeguarding Training – a two and half hour awareness training is available on resources to bring together police and teachers and outside agencies who might deliver and support lessons locally.

Free website access to  dotcomcf.org and vvvuk.com  for all films and teachers guides / evaluation.

Training available across both primary and secondary resources which includes the latest safeguarding risks to children and work with vulnerable families.

History

The Dot Com programme was started with funding from the Metropolitan Police and continued to be developed with Police and Home Office funding.

The Watch Over Me soap was funded by the Home Office and DFE and launches attended by the Home Secretary, Education Secretary, Police and Fire Minister over a number of years.

In Croydon Domestic Violence is an issue with 80% of vulnerable families being supported by the

council. The council introduced the programme to 10,000 primary school children in 80 schools across the borough as part of domestic violence prevention in 2013/14.

The Values Versus Violence suite of resources are Home Office and EU funded and have been piloted and evaluated by the DFE and ROSPA. The DFE funded a pilot of the materials for 3000 children in all 150 local authority areas and the offer was taken up in 135 of the areas across the country.

The development of the VVV resources spans the last 10 years and funding came through different prevention strategies at the Home Office and DFE. Civil servants working directly to the Home Secretary and Secretary of State for Education included the National Children’s Bureau as advisors on the resources.

The NCB advised that children need a sustained approach to learning if they are to successfully take on board messages and so the VVV programme employs two mechanisms to consistently deliver values education which helps children make safer choices and gives them a resilience to grooming of any kind. Working with the Home Office the resources were designed to reflect the main messages that the police and emergency services would want to deliver to children without officers having to be in the classroom.

In evaluation ROSPA supported the resources because research shows that safety education is most effective when delivered by the teacher but supported by outside agencies.

The Dot Com Children’s Foundation was launched at the Home Office in 2013 by civil servant volunteers. The Home Office logo was given to the charity by the Crime Prevention Minister and the charity was given permission to use the words ‘supported by the Home Office’ on resources by civil servants.

The charity has created a number of high quality resources over a period of more than 10 years for both primary and secondary school children which help educate children about violent crime including knife crime, weapons, gang and youth violence, domestic violence, PREVENT, child abuse and FGM.

The  Values Versus Violence Education Programme for both primary and secondary schools has been developed with Home Office funding either granted directly or given through Police sources. It has been nationally and locally piloted and is currently in use in schools with 33 thousand children in Birmingham, London, Essex, Manchester, Merseyside, South Yorkshire and Oxford. 

One of the main reasons for the success of the programme which is run by our charity is the support we have had from ACPO Presidents and civil servants. The Government Finance Profession and Treasury Outreach Programmes have been particularly active in helping to develop strategy and a network of role models and volunteers to visit schools, support the programme and inspire children. The charity has had a number of civil service fast streamers help to develop strategy and development of materials.

The resources are delivered through high quality soap opera for teenagers and a set of children’s journals based on a cartoon character called Dot Com for primary schools. There are a range of free resources for schools as well as paid for materials and safeguarding training. The charity also operates a very successful parent programme for vulnerable families and children.

The Values Versus Violence Programme unites children from all backgrounds and religions by reinforcing good family values in school and helping children practice how to do the right thing. It is a programme developed with the support of the police and teaching professionals and is designed to prevent children from being hurt or becoming victimised or groomed into criminal behaviour.

Using a cartoon character called Dot Com, who speaks to children in their own language, the programme helps them develop the skills to deal with risky situations and learn to make their own

choices. Based on the Protective Behaviours Process children learn that we are all individual and

special and we all have the right to feel safe all the time. It helps children learn how to communicate with adults by teaching them that we can talk with someone about anything even if it feels awful or small.

Children who value themselves and have good personal values make safer choices and are more

likely to reach their full potential in life. The programme is delivered in primary school to children

aged 5 to 11 through a series of personal journals that each child owns. Local community role

models are also encouraged to visit schools to talk to children about dreams and aspirations and to

help them believe they can achieve in life. A family journal which the children take home involves

parents in reinforcing the good values message and there are a range of options offered by the charity for working with families on a one to one basis with supporting materials.

All children need the chance to practice the values they learn at home among their peers and Dot

encourages children to follow the golden rule of all religions ‘treat others as you would like to be

treated yourself’.

RESOURCES

The resources use a cartoon character and series of personal values journals, including a family journal for use at home, to deliver the messages to primary school children.

A values soap opera supported by targeted films on key issues delivers the message to secondary schools. The soap called Watch Over Me is a Secondary School soap funded for schools to use by the Home Office and police and clips are available for download on www.vvvuk.com

The resources cover the following issues developed as part of Home Office prevention strategies:

Knife and Gun Crime/Ending Gang and Youth Violence – Primary school journals in Year 5 and 6 were updated with lessons through TKAP and the Kinsella Report. Series 2 and 3 of Watch Over Me covers the issue of knives and guns with bespoke film packages to support.

Domestic Violence – Values Versus Violence journal and Year 3 primary journal . Series 2 Watch Over Me also covers this issue.

PREVENT / Terrorism – All primary journals updated through PREVENT funding from Home Office and DFE to include ‘Living Together’ lessons. Series 4 Watch Over Me and a bespoke Living Together film with lesson plans created with ACPO TAM.

FGM – The VVV primary school resources have been endorsed and recommend to safeguarding boards as a prevention for FGM in a guide created by the Violent Crime Unit at the Home Office in 2014. Also recommended is the bespoke film called ‘Cut – Some Wounds Never Heal’ which was funded by the Home Office and overseen by Operation Azure in the Metropolitan Police. It was made by teenagers about the issue and can be found with lesson plans at www.vvvuk.com.

Child Sexual Exploitation – Primary school journals have been updated to include social media risks and are in use in Oxfordshire brought in by Thames Valley Police and the Safeguarding Board as a prevention strategy. A parent programme is being developed with Police and social services to alert parents to the risks and then allow them to work on a family journal with children to build resilience in children to the groomers.

Knives and Weapons –

Child Abuse/Self Harm – The primary school journals all carry the Protective Behaviours theme ‘We can talk with someone about anything even if it feels awful or small’. Sarah’s Story on www.vvvuk.com is the story of a teenage girl who was sexually abused and explains how this lead to self harm.

Street Robbery/Bullying/Peer Pressure – Primary school journals in Year 5 and 6 carry specific lessons on these issues including Theft and What is a Crime, as well as The Value of the Law.   Series 1 of  Watch Over Me covers these issues and was made in memory of Milly Dowler, who was abducted on her way home from school and murdered.

Teenage Pregnancy/Relationships and Choices – Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue of sex and relationships. Primary school journals in Years 4 and 5 cover building relationships and who we might marry.

Drugs and Alcohol/Volatile Substance Abuse – Primary school journals in years 5 and 6 were updated with lessons in 2011. Series 4 Watch Over Me also covers this issue.

Social Media and Internet Safety – Primary school journals covers these issues and were        updated in 2013 to include CSE issues. Lessons were created in partnership with CEOP. Series 3 Watch Over Me carries a CEOP story line and was filmed with officers based there.

Fraud/Loan Sharks/Debt/Value of Money – Primary school journals in Years 4, 5 and 6 were updated with lessons supported by the HM Treasury Outreach Programme. Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue of fraud and loan sharks which was developed with the Serious Fraud Squad and City of London Police.

Dreams and Aspirations – If children are to achieve in life then teachers and role models need to encourage dreams and aspirations. All primary journals include these lessons and they are supported by visits from civil servant volunteers at the Home Office. Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue along with employment.

Parents – a family journal and ‘Getting to Know You’ journals is available for schools to run workshops with parents and for children to take home to work with their families on the key issues and values education.

Teacher and Police Lesson Plans are included in the programme all linked into the curriculum so they can be delivered by the teacher but supported by the police.

Safeguarding Training – a two and half hour awareness training is available on resources to bring together police and teachers and outside agencies who might deliver and support lessons locally.

Free website access to  dotcomcf.org and vvvuk.com  for all films and teachers guides / evaluation.

Training available across both primary and secondary resources which includes the latest safeguarding risks to children and work with vulnerable families.

History

The Dot Com programme was started with funding from the Metropolitan Police and continued to be developed with Police and Home Office funding.

The Watch Over Me soap was funded by the Home Office and DFE and launches attended by the Home Secretary, Education Secretary, Police and Fire Minister over a number of years.

In Croydon Domestic Violence is an issue with 80% of vulnerable families being supported by the

council. The council introduced the programme to 10,000 primary school children in 80 schools across the borough as part of domestic violence prevention in 2013/14.

The Values Versus Violence suite of resources are Home Office and EU funded and have been piloted and evaluated by the DFE and ROSPA. The DFE funded a pilot of the materials for 3000 children in all 150 local authority areas and the offer was taken up in 135 of the areas across the country.

The development of the VVV resources spans the last 10 years and funding came through different prevention strategies at the Home Office and DFE. Civil servants working directly to the Home Secretary and Secretary of State for Education included the National Children’s Bureau as advisors on the resources.

The NCB advised that children need a sustained approach to learning if they are to successfully take on board messages and so the VVV programme employs two mechanisms to consistently deliver values education which helps children make safer choices and gives them a resilience to grooming of any kind. Working with the Home Office the resources were designed to reflect the main messages that the police and emergency services would want to deliver to children without officers having to be in the classroom.

In evaluation ROSPA supported the resources because research shows that safety education is most effective when delivered by the teacher but supported by outside agencies.

The Dot Com Children’s Foundation was launched at the Home Office in 2013 by civil servant volunteers. The Home Office logo was given to the charity by the Crime Prevention Minister and the charity was given permission to use the words ‘supported by the Home Office’ on resources by civil servants.

The charity has created a number of high quality resources over a period of more than 10 years for both primary and secondary school children which help educate children about violent crime including knife crime, weapons, gang and youth violence, domestic violence, PREVENT, child abuse and FGM.

The  Values Versus Violence Education Programme for both primary and secondary schools has been developed with Home Office funding either granted directly or given through Police sources. It has been nationally and locally piloted and is currently in use in schools with 33 thousand children in Birmingham, London, Essex, Manchester, Merseyside, South Yorkshire and Oxford. 

One of the main reasons for the success of the programme which is run by our charity is the support we have had from ACPO Presidents and civil servants. The Government Finance Profession and Treasury Outreach Programmes have been particularly active in helping to develop strategy and a network of role models and volunteers to visit schools, support the programme and inspire children. The charity has had a number of civil service fast streamers help to develop strategy and development of materials.

The resources are delivered through high quality soap opera for teenagers and a set of children’s journals based on a cartoon character called Dot Com for primary schools. There are a range of free resources for schools as well as paid for materials and safeguarding training. The charity also operates a very successful parent programme for vulnerable families and children.

The Values Versus Violence Programme unites children from all backgrounds and religions by reinforcing good family values in school and helping children practice how to do the right thing. It is a programme developed with the support of the police and teaching professionals and is designed to prevent children from being hurt or becoming victimised or groomed into criminal behaviour.

Using a cartoon character called Dot Com, who speaks to children in their own language, the programme helps them develop the skills to deal with risky situations and learn to make their own

choices. Based on the Protective Behaviours Process children learn that we are all individual and

special and we all have the right to feel safe all the time. It helps children learn how to communicate with adults by teaching them that we can talk with someone about anything even if it feels awful or small.

Children who value themselves and have good personal values make safer choices and are more

likely to reach their full potential in life. The programme is delivered in primary school to children

aged 5 to 11 through a series of personal journals that each child owns. Local community role

models are also encouraged to visit schools to talk to children about dreams and aspirations and to

help them believe they can achieve in life. A family journal which the children take home involves

parents in reinforcing the good values message and there are a range of options offered by the charity for working with families on a one to one basis with supporting materials.

All children need the chance to practice the values they learn at home among their peers and Dot

encourages children to follow the golden rule of all religions ‘treat others as you would like to be

treated yourself’.

RESOURCES

The resources use a cartoon character and series of personal values journals, including a family journal for use at home, to deliver the messages to primary school children.

A values soap opera supported by targeted films on key issues delivers the message to secondary schools. The soap called Watch Over Me is a Secondary School soap funded for schools to use by the Home Office and police and clips are available for download on www.vvvuk.com

The resources cover the following issues developed as part of Home Office prevention strategies:

Knife and Gun Crime/Ending Gang and Youth Violence – Primary school journals in Year 5 and 6 were updated with lessons through TKAP and the Kinsella Report. Series 2 and 3 of Watch Over Me covers the issue of knives and guns with bespoke film packages to support.

Domestic Violence – Values Versus Violence journal and Year 3 primary journal . Series 2 Watch Over Me also covers this issue.

PREVENT / Terrorism – All primary journals updated through PREVENT funding from Home Office and DFE to include ‘Living Together’ lessons. Series 4 Watch Over Me and a bespoke Living Together film with lesson plans created with ACPO TAM.

FGM – The VVV primary school resources have been endorsed and recommend to safeguarding boards as a prevention for FGM in a guide created by the Violent Crime Unit at the Home Office in 2014. Also recommended is the bespoke film called ‘Cut – Some Wounds Never Heal’ which was funded by the Home Office and overseen by Operation Azure in the Metropolitan Police. It was made by teenagers about the issue and can be found with lesson plans at www.vvvuk.com.

Child Sexual Exploitation – Primary school journals have been updated to include social media risks and are in use in Oxfordshire brought in by Thames Valley Police and the Safeguarding Board as a prevention strategy. A parent programme is being developed with Police and social services to alert parents to the risks and then allow them to work on a family journal with children to build resilience in children to the groomers.

Knives and Weapons –

Child Abuse/Self Harm – The primary school journals all carry the Protective Behaviours theme ‘We can talk with someone about anything even if it feels awful or small’. Sarah’s Story on www.vvvuk.com is the story of a teenage girl who was sexually abused and explains how this lead to self harm.

Street Robbery/Bullying/Peer Pressure – Primary school journals in Year 5 and 6 carry specific lessons on these issues including Theft and What is a Crime, as well as The Value of the Law.   Series 1 of  Watch Over Me covers these issues and was made in memory of Milly Dowler, who was abducted on her way home from school and murdered.

Teenage Pregnancy/Relationships and Choices – Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue of sex and relationships. Primary school journals in Years 4 and 5 cover building relationships and who we might marry.

Drugs and Alcohol/Volatile Substance Abuse – Primary school journals in years 5 and 6 were updated with lessons in 2011. Series 4 Watch Over Me also covers this issue.

Social Media and Internet Safety – Primary school journals covers these issues and were        updated in 2013 to include CSE issues. Lessons were created in partnership with CEOP. Series 3 Watch Over Me carries a CEOP story line and was filmed with officers based there.

Fraud/Loan Sharks/Debt/Value of Money – Primary school journals in Years 4, 5 and 6 were updated with lessons supported by the HM Treasury Outreach Programme. Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue of fraud and loan sharks which was developed with the Serious Fraud Squad and City of London Police.

Dreams and Aspirations – If children are to achieve in life then teachers and role models need to encourage dreams and aspirations. All primary journals include these lessons and they are supported by visits from civil servant volunteers at the Home Office. Series 4 Watch Over Me covers this issue along with employment.

Parents – a family journal and ‘Getting to Know You’ journals is available for schools to run workshops with parents and for children to take home to work with their families on the key issues and values education.

Teacher and Police Lesson Plans are included in the programme all linked into the curriculum so they can be delivered by the teacher but supported by the police.

Safeguarding Training – a two and half hour awareness training is available on resources to bring together police and teachers and outside agencies who might deliver and support lessons locally.

Free website access to  dotcomcf.org and vvvuk.com  for all films and teachers guides / evaluation.

Training available across both primary and secondary resources which includes the latest safeguarding risks to children and work with vulnerable families.

History

The Dot Com programme was started with funding from the Metropolitan Police and continued to be developed with Police and Home Office funding.

The Watch Over Me soap was funded by the Home Office and DFE and launches attended by the Home Secretary, Education Secretary, Police and Fire Minister over a number of years.

In Croydon Domestic Violence is an issue with 80% of vulnerable families being supported by the

council. The council introduced the programme to 10,000 primary school children in 80 schools across the borough as part of domestic violence prevention in 2013/14.

The Values Versus Violence suite of resources are Home Office and EU funded and have been piloted and evaluated by the DFE and ROSPA. The DFE funded a pilot of the materials for 3000 children in all 150 local authority areas and the offer was taken up in 135 of the areas across the country.

The development of the VVV resources spans the last 10 years and funding came through different prevention strategies at the Home Office and DFE. Civil servants working directly to the Home Secretary and Secretary of State for Education included the National Children’s Bureau as advisors on the resources.

The NCB advised that children need a sustained approach to learning if they are to successfully take on board messages and so the VVV programme employs two mechanisms to consistently deliver values education which helps children make safer choices and gives them a resilience to grooming of any kind. Working with the Home Office the resources were designed to reflect the main messages that the police and emergency services would want to deliver to children without officers having to be in the classroom.

In evaluation ROSPA supported the resources because research shows that safety education is most effective when delivered by the teacher but supported by outside agencies.

Evaluation: Dr Suzanne Zeedyke – The core message that seems to be emerging from this work is that the children and young people involved come to the conclusion that they are best able to keep themselves safe by looking out for the safety of others. Building stronger relationships with others improves their own sense of safety. And the programmes empower the children by giving them knowledge about how they can actively create such environments and relationships – through actions such as kindness, respect, and friendship.

Secondary schools  – see below :  Female Genital Mutilation. This film is endorsed by the Home Office. It is advisable to view the film in the first instance to understand the content. A teachers guide is available. Click here (this will take you to Values Versus Violence website, where you can view all of the films and download teachers guides).

Series 4 covers the issues of radicalisation. Watch Over Me 4 was produced for an older audience, however, it may be helpful for background information.